Weight Management

There’s no secret that calories are the key ingredient to losing weight steadily and efficiently. When combined with an exercise program, you will have the ingredients you need to better manage your weight. Contrary to popular belief, it is not healthy to lose more than 1 pound of muscle per week according to renowned sports nutritionist Michael Colgan Ph.D, of the Institute of Nutritional Sciences. If you are losing any more weight than that, you will want to make sure that it is either fat, glycogen or water weight. Any weight loss program worth its weight in salt should consider diet and calorie maintenance the priority and weight training and fitness second. This is why you should first learn to measure your energy expenditure before you begin to perform any fitness or weight training regime. Only by knowing where you stand in terms of body fat and energy balance will you be able to move on to lose weight in the healthiest way possible.

Body Fat

Weigh yourself on a scale to determine how heavy you are in either pounds or kilograms.

Pinch a layer of skin between the index finger and thumb of your off hand. Place the jaws of the calipers around this layer of skin.

Release the trigger so that your skin is firmly between the jaws of the calipers. Then, take note of the reading that your calipers display. Make sure to continue to hold the fold of skin firmly between the caliper jaws while you are taking the measurements. Your body fat chart should give you 3-4 different areas of the body to take readings from. Your body fat kid should also include the chart or table or you can use your numbers to determine your body fat percentage.

Energy Balance

Multiply your body fat percentage by your total weight to find out your fat weight. Subtract fat weight from total body weight to find your lean body mass (LBM). Make sure your lean body mass is in kilograms (1 pound = 2.2kg). Multiply LBM by 21.6. Add 370 to this number to determine your BMR.

Calculate your total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) by multiplying your BMR by a multiplier of 1.55 if you are moderately active. If you lead a sedentary lifestyle use a multiplier of 1.2; if you lead a very active lifestyle, use a multiplier of 1.9. This TDEE represents the number of calories that you need in order to maintain your current body weight. As a reference, women average a TDEE of around 2000, while men average around 2700.

Write down your TDEE and track your caloric intake for 1 week. To gain weight, make sure to exceed your TDEE by at least 500 calories per day. Weigh yourself after 1 week to determine if you need to increase or decrease your caloric intake based on individual body differences and lifestyle.

Tips

For a rough estimate of your basal metabolic rate, multiply your body weight by 24 if you are a man, or by 21.6 if you are a woman.